Tips for the Gurl in Transition and the Newly Nappy Gurl

I’m not an expert on natural hair and nor do I want to be, but I a lot of people I know are making the transition to natural hair or is already a napptural woman. I have been natural for 13 months (yea!!!)  and I have had my share of ups and downs—some restless nights and “What have I done to my hair!” moments. But, I can say that I am happy with my hair’s health.

I didn’t understand the tips that I’m going to give you in this note, so hopefully, you guys will take my word for it and learn from my mistakes

TIP 1: Heat is not Your Friend

Remember this Equation—Heat + Afro-Hair= DAMAGE!!!!

Lots of Damage…. One of the worst things you can do to your hair is to apply heat.

For those of you who are transitioning, you really don’t want to press the roots of your hair. Think about this: you keep pressing your roots out until you feel cutting off the permed ends. Your new growth, your natural hair, is damaged by the heat. Now you have a head full of damaged, natural hair.

For those who are newly napptural, the effects of pressing your hair is extremely dire. 1.) Your hair is going to be damaged and 2.) Your hair will be permanently straight… and if you wanted that, you defeated the purpose of being natural.

Tip 2: Water, Water, Water!!!

Water is your friend. It’s a natural moisturizer that is essential to the health of your hair.

You can use water on your hair or you can drink it. Either way, it’s a necessity.

Tip 3: Don’t be a Product Junkie

One of the easiest things a newly natural or a person in transition can do is go out and buy every product another person says is a “miracle worker.” After 4 months, I can say I’ve literally tried over 30 different products on my hair because some other person say it works for them.

I didn’t realize that not everyone’s hair is the same and that what works for them may not necessarily work for me.

You need a good shampoo, that you can use sparingly (I’ll talk about that later!), a great conditioner and an awesome leave-in conditioner.

Start out with those three products and when you find them, stick with them! Stick with what works for you and not anyone else.

Tip 4: Give Your Scalp Some Attention

Though your hair shaft might have changed, your scalp has stayed the same. It still needs to be oiled just like before or it’ll itch uncontrollably—the best thing about that is that you can finally scratch it and not beat the crap out of your skull!!!!!

Caution, though, what you use. When finding the right type of scalp moisturizer, essential oils—like olive oil, jojoba oil and tea tree oil—are the best thing for you. Grease like Blue Magic has PETROLETUM and MINERAL OIL in it and those two are HORRIBLE for Afro-Hair.

Tip 5: Love Your Hair

This is the most important tip I can give anyone who is transitioning and who is newly napptural. I find that going to all these natural hair websites, though they do provide amazing information, a lot of these women have been natural for years and their hair is long and curly.

This may bring down your hair-esteem and you may want your hair to be like the women in the picture and become impatient.

Believe me, I’ve been there! Wanting hair like Tracy Ellis Ross and Alicia Keys but not understanding that I’m full Black and not everyone’s hair is the same.

EVERYONE’S HAIR IS NOT THE SAME!!!

Everyone’s hair is different textures. For example, me and my twin sister both have different hair. While, Nikki’s (my twin sister)  is THICK and coily, my curls are a bit more loser, but just as THICK.

So remember that your hair is YOUR HAIR. Love it, Live it and Own it.

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One thought on “Tips for the Gurl in Transition and the Newly Nappy Gurl

  1. Hi NappyCentric,

    I have enjoyed your spill on African American hair. You have made a true statement that I hear often, Love Your Hair. I have made a commitment to my hair as I begin my transitional journey to natural styled hair. Check out my blog and if you have any tips that may help me please feel free to share because I am nervous. Thanks for your in-site, helpful.

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